Phrasal verbs- part two 🥳

In a previous post, I went over some information about phrasal verbs (you can check it out here Phrasal Verbs – friends or foes) , but some questions have come up from some of my students so I came up with the idea of writing another post on phrasal verbs.

First – how many phrasal verbs have you come across in this post so far?

Five ! We use them a lot as native speakers so they are very important for you to learn too!

Even if you don’t know the meanings of these phrasal verbs, you might be able to work them out (another phrasal verb) from the context. This is an important skill to learn to improve your reading skills.

See how you go 😊

Match the following phrasal verbs with the meanings below :

go over     come across check out       work out             come up come up with                           
*find something you weren’t looking for         *think of an (idea or suggestion)     
*look at something to see what you think *understand something or resolve it *look at something or examine it  *appear        

Read on to see if you were correct ⬇️

Let’s talk about different types of phrasal verbs :

Intransitive – these phrasal verbs do not have objects.

Some questions have come up. ( appeared)

Transitive these phrasal verbs always have objects.

I went over( examined/looked at) some information about phrasal verbs.

I came up with ( thought of ) the idea of writing another post on phrasal verbs.

These phrasal verbs are inseparable which means the phrasal verbs can’t be separated – we cannot put an object in between parts of the phrasal verbs.

Separable phrasal verbs can be separated- the object can come in the middle of the phrasal verb.

You can check my phrasal verb post out here ( look at my post to see what you think )
* Please note that you do not have to separate the phrasal verb -You can check out my phrasal verb post here.

However, if we use a pronoun instead of a noun as the object , we must separate the phrasal verb -we must put the pronoun in the middle of the phrasal verb:

You can check it out ✅

You can check out it ❌

Even if you don’t know the meanings of these phrasal verbs, you might be able to work them out (understand them) from the context. This is also separable so the object can come in the middle of the phrasal verb or after it (if we use the noun as the object but we must separate the phrasal verb if we use the pronoun)

You might be able to work the meanings out

You might be able to work out the meanings ✅

You might be able to work them out

You might be able to work out them ❌

Check out the phrasal verb quizzes from my blog post Phrasal verbs –friends or foes and try to work out what kind of phrasal verbs they are 😊

Published by rachelkimschultz

I have been in the ESL industry for over 25 years , first starting out teaching English in Japan after I graduated from university . I have taught English in Australia for about 20 years to many different nationalities which I love and I have also taught TESOL Certificate IV so I am a teacher trainer as well. I have worked as an academic manager for about 8 years, managing, training and supporting teachers. I love teaching all levels of English and enjoy teaching TOEIC ,IELTS and Cambridge Exam (PET, FCE and CAE) preparation courses.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: